Blue Economy Library

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This publication aims to first provide decision makers and managers with information on the existing international and regional regulations that address the use of alien species in aquaculture, either directly or indirectly; and three examples of national responses to this issue. The last section of this document provides some considerations and suggestions to be taken into account by decision makers and managers when using -or deciding on the use of- alien species for aquaculture purposes.  Alien Species in Aquaculture - Considerations for responsible use, Hewitt, C.L., Campbell, M.L. and Gollasch, S.,  IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK, 2006 [Published: 2006]
Policy, Global
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Eggs of the olive ridley marine turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) have been harvested by generations of Pacific coast communities in Central America for both economic and nutritional reasons. There has been little economic analysis that has identified possible points of improvements for management of the resource. Three egg harvesting projects were studied in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Field research using semi-structured interviews with stakeholders and key informants were undertaken in June and July 2000. Wildlife harvesting, conservation and poverty: the economics of olive ridley egg exploitation - Foundation for Environmental Conservation, University of Newcastle, UK, 31 May 2002 [Published: 2002]
Production & Utilisation, Americas
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In 1999, TRAFFIC North America initiated a review of the exploitation, trade, and management of marine turtles in 11 countries and territories in the Northern Caribbean.  This review, which combined desk research and field surveys, was undertaken to gather and synthesize information about harvest of marine turtles, use of and trade in their products, and the effects these activities may be having on marine turtle populations.  Updated information of this nature had been lacking, and it was felt that an overview of current exploitation of marine turtles would be essential to the success of ongoing efforts to manage and conserve marine turtles in the region. Swimming Against the Tide: Recent Surveys of Exploitation, Trade, And Management of Marine Turtles In the Northern Caribbean - TRAFFIC North America, Washington, D.C., USA, April 2001 [Published: 2001]
Markets & Trade, Americas
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This study highlights the importance of interspecific interactions among marine organisms and the effect that these trophic interactions have on the development of effective, adaptive management strategies for reef fishes in the Gulf of Mexico.  [Published: 2018]
Production & Utilisation, Americas
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This report was drafted by a working group of United Nations entities, the World Bank, and other stakeholders to suggest a common understanding of the blue economy; to highlight the importance of such an approach, particularly for small island developing states and coastal least developed countries; to identify some of the key challenges its adoption poses; and to suggest some broad next steps that are called for in order to ensure its implementation.  [Published: 2018]
Production & Utilisation, Global
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With international consultation with stakeholders, the MSC has developed standards for sustainable fishing and seafood traceability. They ensure that MSC-labelled seafood comes from, and can be traced back to, a sustainable fishery. The MSC Fisheries Standard sets out requirements that a fishery must meet to enable it to claim that its fish come from a well-managed and sustainable source. [Published: 2015]
Policy, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Global
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‘Sustainable use’ of wildlife resources and ‘community based conservation’ are two themes recurrent in contemporary statements of wildlife conservation policy, and their use is in response to a perceived ‘deep conservation crisis’ which has in part arisen from exclusionary and restrictive conservation practices. The extent to which the legal harvest of marine turtle eggs in Ostional, Costa Rica, is an example of sustainable use and community based conservation is evaluated in this paper. Field research using in-depth interviewing and a household questionnaire was undertaken in Ostional during 1994 and 1995, to investigate local perceptions of the egg harvesting project, both positive and negative. Use them or lose them? Conservation and the consumptive use of marine turtle eggs at Ostional, Costa Rica - Community Conservation, Costa Rica, Department of Geography, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada, September 1998 [Published: 1998]
Guidelines & Case Studies, Americas
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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer id mi lacus. Integer ac quam magna. Maecenas interdum felis lectus, at commodo eros rhoncus sed. Aliquam vel nisi quis tellus lacinia egestas in quis enim. Vivamus eleifend orci nec mi blandit, at fermentum felis malesuada. Aenean convallis porta dolor, et consequat arcu. Sed tempus mollis vulputate. Fusce vitae turpis neque. Morbi pretium tellus sed nisi bibendum semper. Sed nec tellus sit amet tellus vulputate convallis a sit amet purus. Donec elementum fringilla lobortis. Nulla egestas congue facilisis. Ut feugiat massa in tortor finibus faucibus. [Published: 1998]
Production & Utilisation, Africa