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The mining and metals industry’s biodiversity conservation performance is under increasing scrutiny from NGOs, commentators and financial analysts. This is due in part to a growing awareness of the importance of biodiversity conservation, but also because the industry often operates in remote and environmentally sensitive areas of the world. Demonstrating a commitment to biodiversity conservation is now an essential element of sustainable development for the mining and metals industry. Good Practice Guidance for Mining and Biodiversity - International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM), London, UK, 2006 [Published: 2006]
Guidelines, Extractive Industries, Global
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This guide, and its companion report, Integrating Sustainability into Business: A management guide for responsible tour operations, are designed to help the individual assigned responsibility for promoting responsible tourism determine both what needs to be changed within a company, and how to facilitate those changes. Integrating Sustainability Into Business: An Implementation Guide for Responsible Tourism Coordinators - UNEP, Paris, France, 2005 [Published: 2005]
Guidelines, Recreation and Tourism, Global
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The idea of sustainability – and its three pillars of economic, environmental and social action – is now a part of decision-making in many fields. For tourism, as for other industries, the implementation of sustainable development relies on companies accepting their social and environmental responsibilities towards society, and making changes to their business practices to improve their sustainability performance. Integrating Sustainability Into Business: A Management Guide for Responsible Tour Operations - UNEP, Paris, France, 2005 [Published: 2005]
Guidelines, Recreation and Tourism, Global
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This IPIECA guide is designed to help HSE professionals and other relevant staff, e.g. those involved with project planning, in the oil and gas industry to develop Biodiversity Action Plans (BAPs) for their sites and projects. BAPs are a systematic approach to biodiversity conservation that can build on, and be integrated with, existing company activities and processes throughout the oil and gas project life cycle. A Guide to Developing Biodiversity Action Plans for the Oil and Gas Sector - IPIECA/OGP, October 2005 [Published: 2005]
Guidelines, Extractive Industries, Global
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These principles are intended to promote “biodiversity-inclusive” impact assessment (IA), including Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for projects, and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) for policies, plans and programs. They should help practitioners to integrate biodiversity in IA, decision-makers to commission and review IAs, and other stakeholders to ensure their biodiversity interests are addressed in development planning. Biodiversity in Impact Assessment - International Association for Impact Assessment, Fargo, ND, USA, July 2005 [Published: 2005]
Guidelines, Global
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This publication summarizes the results of research on the triple bottom line, emphasizing environmental, social and economic sustainability in the ecolodge sector. Key factors are highlighted that make an ecolodge environmentally, socially and financially successful. Ecolodges: Exploring Opportunities for Sustainable Business - International Finance Corporation, Washington, DC, USA, 2004 [Published: 2004]
Guidelines, Global
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Construction projects, whether commercial developments, housing estates, infrastructure or public-sector projects, all have the potential to damage natural habitats, threatening wildlife and plant species. The construction industry therefore has an important role to play in protecting sensitive sites and minimising damage to ecology. There is generally a poor understanding of biodiversity issues within the construction industry, however. To help the industry tackle this, BRE and CIRIA have developed the following set of complementary biodiversity indicators that allow the impact of construction projects on biodiversity to be measured:
1. Impact on biodiversity: product.
2. Impact on biodiversity: construction process.
3. Area of habitat. Biodiversity Indicators for Construction Projects - Woodall, R and Crowhurst, D, Construction Industry Research and Information Association, London, UK, July 2003 [Published: 2003]
Guidelines, Global
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Biodiversity is the life support system for our planet. There are more than six billion people and the world is heading for eight or nine billion by 2050. Their livelihoods depend on our planet’s biodiversity, in the form of ecosytems, species and genetic material. There may be differences of opinion about the rate of loss, but there is no doubt that ecosystems, species and genes are being lost or damaged faster than ever before. Such a loss undermines the natural richness of our planet and threatens our future sustainability. This report acknowledges that business and society in general share responsibility for the current deteriorating situation as well as for solutions to improve it. Business & Biodiversity: The Handbook for Corporate Action - Earthwatch Institute (Europe), International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, World Business Council for Sustainable Development, 2002 [Published: 2002]
Guidelines, Global
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We reviewed the biodiversity requirements of 36 environmental standards sampled from eight business sectors with the aims of gaining an understanding of the treatment of biodiversity across sectors, to highlight commonalities and differences, and to help businesses and funding agencies to improve their internal processes. It is also hoped that this review will stimulate the development of best practice guidelines and ultimately result in more effective and harmonised standards.

UNEP-WCMC 2011. Review of the Biodiversity Requirements of Standards and Certification Schemes: A snapshot of current practices. Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Montréal, Canada. Technical Series No. 63, 30 pages.   [Published: 2011]
Standards, Global
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The guidance provided in this Part 3: Biodiversity Impact Assessment Toolbox complements Part 1: Core Guidance for Project Proponents and Part 2: Social Impact Assessment Toolbox. Biodiversity impact assessment requires expert inputs in the design and other aspects of monitoring as described in Section 5, and local participation in identifying the biodiversity objectives of a project and understanding likely biodiversity effects of interventions is usually essential. Biodiversity impacts often result in livelihood impacts as well, and for these reasons the guidance in Part 2 is also relevant to Part 3. Social and Biodiversity Impact Assessment are best done in an integrated way. 

Pitman, N. 2011. Social and Biodiversity Impact Assessment Manual for REDD+ Projects: Part 3 – Biodiversity Impact Assessment Toolbox.  Forest Trends, Climate, Community & Biodiversity Alliance, Rainforest Alliance and Fauna & Flora International. Washington, DC. [Published: 2011]
Conservation Management, Guidelines, Global
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