Wildlife Economy Library

RECENTLY ADDED

Two species of tegu lizards, Tupinambis rufescens and T. teguixin, are heavily exploited in Argentina, Paraguay, and parts of Brazil and Bolivia for their skins for use as exotic leather accessories. This news article discusses the life history of tegus, characteristics of the traditional system of exploitation, and legal regimes that impact the legal and sustainable trade of the species. Tupinambis Lizards and People: A Sustainable Use Approach to Conservation and Development - Lee A. Fitzgerald, Conservation Biology, Vol. 8, No. 1, Society for Conservation Biology, March 1994 [Published: 1994]
Production & Utilisation, Americas
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
Wildlife has many uses: these could be subsistence, commerce or trade, recreation and tourism…. It is a fact that total protection makes wildlife lose its economic value; consequently wildlife comes out second best in the competition for the most appropriate land use. Best Practices in Sustainable Hunting: A Guide to Best Practices from Around the World - Baldus, R. D.; Damm, G. R. & Wollscheid, K. (eds.), 2008 [Published: 2008]
Production & Utilisation, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The focus of this study is on developing countries as these host most of the biodiversity and wildlife. The main results are as follows: While economists often believe that, in general, the best way to conserve wildlife and their habitat is to encourage efficient and sustainable use of these resources, the scope of EIs in such conservation efforts as an ‘extra measure’ to regulate harvesting pressure may in some cases be limited. Economic Incentives and Wildlife Conservation - Erwin H. Bulte, G. Cornelis van Kooten, Timothy Swanson, 27 October 2003 [Published: 2003]
Production & Utilisation, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
A thorough review of the potential conflicts between the provisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the international trade rules including identified areas where the two are complementary. Integrating Implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Rules of the World Trade Organization  - Downes, David R., IUCN
Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge UK, 1999 [Published: 1999]
Policy, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
This paper explores multiple-objective projects that address vicuña conservation and poverty alleviation in Andean countries. In doing so, it analyses the tensions that exist between these objectives, as well as the factors that limit a more equitable distribution of benefits among stakeholders. Vicuña conservation and poverty alleviation? Andean communities and international fibre markets - Gabriela Lichtenstein, Research Article, International Journal of the Commons, Vol 4, No 1, 2010 [Published: 2010]
Markets & Trade, Americas
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity provide a framework for assisting governments, indigenous and local communities, resource managers, the private sector and other stakeholders, about how to ensure that their uses of biological diversity will not lead to its long-term decline. The Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity - Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, Montreal:
Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity 21, 2004 [Published: 2004]
Production & Utilisation, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
This issue of Biores, takes a look at some emerging trends in forest sustainability governance, particularly where these intersect with trade policy. Lars H. Gulbrandsen and Ole Kristian Fauchald from Norway’s Fridtjof Nansen Institute (FNI) assess trade-related action pledges made in the New York Declaration on Forests, unveiled by public and private actors at September 2014's UN climate summit. These include boosting sustainable forest public procurement efforts and sustainability labelling initiatives. Reviewing forest trade governance - ICTSD International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Geneva, Switzerland, May 2015 [Published: 2015]
Markets & Trade, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
Wildlife commerce – legal and prohibited – sits at the nexus of trade, development, and the environment… This issue of BIORES presents two papers offering a glimpse into a few of the many options advocated in the wildlife trade debate. Navigating the Wildlife Trade Debate - ICTSD International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Geneva, Switzerland, March 2014 [Published: 2014]
Markets & Trade, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
This article reviews the last two decades of intergovernmental regulation of trade affecting animals…. Ultimately, the article concludes that the future looks a bit brighter for governmental and non-governmental organizations seeking to improve worldwide protections for wildlife seriously impacted by international trade. Protecting Animals In International Trade: A Study Of The Recent Successes At The WTO And In Free Trade Agreements - Lurié, Andrew, and Maria Kalinina, American University International Law Review 30 no. 3, 2015 [Published: 2015]
Markets & Trade, Global
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
A briefing paper titled ‘Trophy Hunting: UK and international policy’ by Alison Pratt and David Hirst, provides incorrect information to the Members of Parliament in the UK (MPs) and their staff on policy and sustainability aspects of trophy hunting. House of Commons Library Provides Fake News - Brussels, 1 March 2017 [Published: 2017]
Policy, Europe
Thumbnail for attatched PDF