Wildlife Economy Library

RECENTLY ADDED

I am not a hunter. Nor have I ever been. I am a vegetarian (since the age of about 11), I am part of the environmental NGO sector and I have interests in the tourism industry in Namibia. So, it might surprise you that I am a strong supporter of the hunting industry in Namibia, and indeed, throughout Africa. Having said that, I should qualify my support. I am a strong supporter of legal, ethical hunting of indigenous wildlife within sustainably managed populations, in large open landscapes. The Important Link Between Hunting and Tourism in Namibia – both working for conservation - Dr Chris Brown, Namibian Chamber of Environment, March 2017 [Published: 2017]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The marginal economic benefit of trophy hunting is not well known, and rarely studied. Pro-trophy hunting organizations often present estimates of gross economic activity associated with hunting to promote their view that trophy hunting equals conservation because of its economic value. However, given past experiences of unsustainable trophy hunting leading to serious population declines and ultimately bans on trophy hunting, one cannot automatically conclude that simply because there are economic activities associated with trophy hunting, that this is inherently benefiting conservation. The Lion's Share? On the Economic Benefits of Trophy Hunting - Murray, C. K., A report for the Humane Society International, prepared by Economists at Large, Melbourne, Australia, 2017 [Published: 2017]
Guidelines & Case Studies, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
Permits to hunt bighorn sheep are auctioned for hundreds of thousands of dollars — and that money has helped revive wild sheep populations and expand their territory. The Ultimate Pursuit in Hunting: Sheep - John Branch, New York Times, 16 February 2017 [Published: 2017]
Markets & Trade, Americas
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The devolution of user rights of wildlife in southern Africa has led to a widespread land-use shift from livestock farming to game ranching. The economic advantages of game ranching over livestock farming are significant, but so too are the risks associated with breeding financially valuable game where free-ranging wildlife pose a credible threat. The Conservation Costs of Game Ranching - Ross T Pitman et al, Conservation Letters, Society for Conservation Biology, 12 June 2016 [Published: 2016]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
There is growing evidence of escalating wildlife losses worldwide. Extreme wildlife losses have recently been documented for large parts of Africa, including Western, Central and Eastern Africa. This paper documents extreme declines in wildlife and contemporaneous increase in livestock numbers in Kenya rangelands between 1977 and 2016. Extreme Wildlife Declines and Concurrent Increase in Livestock Numbers in Kenya: What are the Causes? - Ogutu JO, Piepho H-P, Said MY, Ojwang GO, Njino LW, Kifugo SC, et al., PLoS ONE, 2016 [Published: 2016]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The Chinese have moved into Africa in a big way, and wherever they are involved, illegal wildlife activities seem to accompany their citizens, prompting a recent diplomatic confrontation in Namibia. Illegal trade in ivory and rhino horn is at the top end of the business, but many other wildlife products are also in demand. What this clearly demonstrates is a lucrative Chinese market for African resources that is currently being met through illegal channels. What if some of this financially significant demand could be met legally, for the financial benefit of Africans and the continent’s wildlife?
  The Chinese in Africa – Curse or Opportunity for Wildlife? - John Ledger, African Hunting Gazette, 2016 [Published: 2016]
Markets & Trade, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
This paper explores the role of wildlife in adaptation to climate change in areas predominantly used for livestock production in South Africa. Using a sample of 1071 wildlife and livestock farms it estimates a multinomial choice model of various adaptation options including livestock and wildlife farming choices. Agriculture and adaptation to climate change: The Role of wildlife ranching in South Africa - Jackson Otieno, Edwin Muchapondwa, ESRA, February 2016 [Published: 2016]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The continent of Africa offers a diverse range of landscapes, cultures, and natural resources, all of which combine to attract international tourists. Considering Africa’s rich wildlife resources, many international tourists travel to Africa to hunt. Given the high costs associated with hunting relative to other forms of tourism, hunting provides Africa with significant economic benefits to the countries and communities who host these travelers. The Economic Contributions of Hunting-Related Tourism in Eastern and Southern Africa - for Safari Club International Foundation, by Southwick Assosciates, Fernandina Beach, FL, USA, November 2015 [Published: 2015]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
Hunting is an integral part of North American cultures, providing a powerful connection to the outdoors for millions of people and generating billions of dollars for local and national economies. Socially, hunting has been part of hominid cultures since very early in the fossil record; a tradition that contemporary North American hunters tend to pass down to subsequent generations through family and community networks. Economic and social benefits of hunting in North America - Edward B. Arnett, Rob Southwick, International Journal of Environmental Studies, 2015 [Published: 2015]
Markets & Trade, Americas
Thumbnail for attatched PDF
The scale of the wildlife crisis is immense and one of the main aims of this document is to underline (a) just how much needs to be done and why, and (b) what are likely to be the most realistic and effective strategic priorities for saving Africa’s wildlife heritage, given the rate of human population growth and associated habitat loss. It is also hoped that the document will serve as a way of federating the different wildlife conservation actors, both within and outside Africa, around a balanced series of common themes. Larger than Elephants: Inputs for an EU strategic approach to wildlife conservation in Africa - European Commission, Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development, Brussels, Belgium, 2015 [Published: 2015]
Policy, Africa
Thumbnail for attatched PDF