Wildlife Economy Library

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Wildlife ranching is emerging as a new frontier for wildlife conservation and alternative land use to agriculture in Southern Africa marginal areas. But the wildlife sector also faces climate-related challenges. This study investigates the effects of climate change on the revenues of wildlife ranchers in South Africa. An Economic Analysis of Climate Change and Wildlife Utilization on Private Land: Evidence from Wildlife Ranching in South Africa - Jackson Otieno, Edwin Muchapondwa, Economic Research Southern Africa, October 2015 [Published: 2015]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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The wave of species extinctions that obliterated 80% of the Pleistocene megaherbivores (≥1000 kg) on planet Earth appears to be continuing today in Africa and Southeast Asia. Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores - William J. Ripple et al, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2015 [Published: 2015]
Guidelines & Case Studies, Global
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Since 2013, Mozambique has been China’s biggest wood supplier on the African continent. Because of illegal timber exports, the country has lost an estimated €113 million in tax revenues since 2007– money that could have financed Mozambique’s national forest programme for 30 years. [Published: 2015]
Guidelines & Case Studies, Africa
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Private individuals can own wildlife in South Africa (Game Theft Act 105 of 1991; Snijders, 2012). This has led to the flourishing trade of wildlife at game auctions, to huge commercial value of trophy hunting and ecotourism, to the broadscale homogenization of mammal communities, and also potentially the saving of many species from extinction.  Overcoming barriers to understanding the biodiversity contribution of private ranchlands - H. T. Davies-Mostert, Animal Conservation, ZSL, 2014 [Published: 2014]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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Advocates for the African trophy hunting industry invariably claim that hunting revenues provide benefits to rural communities. Analysis of literature on the economics of trophy hunting reveals, however, that communities in the areas where hunting occurs derive very little benefit from this revenue. The $200 million question: How much does trophy hunting really contribute to African communities? - Economists at Large, a report for the African Lion Coalition, prepared by Economists at Large, Melbourne, Australia, 2013 [Published: 2013]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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In this paper, the new attempts at regulating wildlife ranches on private land in South Africa are adressed. Although positive conservation impacts can be attributed to private wildlife ranching, there are a number of ecological consequences that often arise as a result of economic priorities. Here, new national regulations aimed at coordinating provincial legislation and guiding the wildlife industry in a more conservationist direction are presented and analysed, and tensions that have arisen between different sociopolitical scales as a result are examined. The Challenge of Regulating Private Wildlife Ranches for Conservation in South Africa - Jenny A. Cousins, Jon P. Sadler, James Evans, Ecology and Society, 2010 [Published: 2010]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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Legislative changes during recent decades resulted in a massive shift away from livestock towards game ranching in southern Africa, resulting in significant increases in the abundance and distribution of many wildlife species. However, there are problems associated with game ranching from a conservation perspective, including persecution of predators, overstocking, introductions of exotic species and genetic manipulation of ‘huntable’ species. In this paper, a preliminary review of the ecological and financial benefits associated with conservancies versus isolated game ranches is provided. The importance of conservancies for enhancing the value of game ranch land for large mammal conservation in southern Africa - P. A. Lindsey, S. S. Romañach, H. T. Davies-Mostert, Journal of Zoology, ZSL, 2009 [Published: 2009]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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The factors that hamper the wildlife industry are discussed and recommendations are made that can possibly improve the industry.  How to Improve Wildlife Production in South Africa - J.G. du Toit, O.L. van Schalkwyk, 2007 [Published: 2007]
Production & Utilisation, Africa
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This document shows the  yearly quotas for the number of macropods that can be harvested in each Australian state from 2010 to 2016. [Published: 2016]
Markets & Trade, Global
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Criteria and indicators (C&I) for sustainable forest management (SFM) are arguably one of the most important and innovative policy instruments for operationalizing the SFM concept (ITTO 2011). Criteria characterize the essential components of SFM, and indicators are ways of assessing those components. When monitored over time, C&I show changes and trends in the biophysical, socioeconomic and policy conditions relevant to SFM. [Published: 2016]
Production & Utilisation, Global
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